Tents

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Question

Do I need to seam seal my tent?

Answer

None of our tents require seam sealing to perform well in the field. However, because the seams on the flies of Exped "extreme" (siliconized) models are not factory taped, some people like to apply seam sealer as insurance.  It is important to match the right seam sealing product to your Exped tent model . It is also vital that you follow the directions closely to ensure a proper and clean coating on your tent fly.

For any of our “Extreme” exo-skeleton tents, we strongly recommend the use of McNett SilNet, which is made specifically for siliconized nylon tent flies.

For all other Exped tents that are factory seam taped with a PU coating, McNett SeamGrip is the right choice. Because these tents are factory taped an waterproof from the factory, repairing a damaged seam is likely the only reason this would be necessary. 

Question

My tent pole broke - what do I do?

Answer

If you are in the field, you can easily repair the pole by using one of the repair sleeves included with the tent. For most of our tents, you will find these in the corner of each pole pocket and also attached to the vents on the rain fly. The only exception is the Mira HL series - for these tents it will be in the repair kit.

To make the field repair, slide the sleeve over the broken section of pole and tape it in place. When you return from your trip, contact us and we can assist with having the pole permanently repaired.

Question

What components are included in the "minimum weight of my tent?"

Answer

The minimum weight of your tent is the tent body, rain fly, and poles. The packaged weight includes the tent body, rain fly, poles, all stakes, stuff sacks, and any accessory parts or repair kits that are packaged with the tent when you purchase it. 

Question

How do I reduce condensation in my tent?

Answer

While it can’t always be prevented, there are several steps you can take to try and eliminate or reduce the condensation build up you may experience in your tent at night.

  1. Reduce or remove as much wet gear as possible from inside the tent
  2. Vent the tent as conditions allow
  3. Use a closed cell foam liner on the tent floor like our MultiMat to create a barrier from the cold wet ground and reduce condensation on the floor
  4. Carry a small sponge for wiping away condensation in challenging atmospheric conditions

Unfortunately, condensation build-up cannot be completely eliminated in tent design. Cool air must flow in to the tent, and warm air needs to be able to escape. When this can’t happen condensation forms. Whenever possible, vent the tent, either by opening the top of the rain fly or if conditions permit keep rain fly door(s) completely open through the night. The goal is to create a cross flow which will ventilate the tent and remove the warm air that is produced from human breath as you sleep through the night. We also provide numerous guy-out points and a stake for each. By utilizing all of these, it will also help increase the flow of air and decrease condensation.

Question

How should I care for my tent after a trip?

Answer

When you return from your trip, whether a weekend or multiple weeks, it’s a good idea to set up your tent to let it dry out and to also allow you a clean location to spruce it up. Once the tent is set up, be sure to clean out the interior, wipe down any dirt that may be stuck to the bottom, and also take a wet warm rag to wipe down all the zippers. If the tent has been used in dirty and/or gritty conditions you may want to lightly spray it with water to loosen material from coatings, stitching and zippers. 

Question

How do I prevent mildew from growing on my tent?

Answer

The key to preventing mildew from growing on your tent is to ensure it is 100% dry before storing it away. We recommend it be stored loosely out of the stuff sack in a dry and temperature controlled environment.

Question

How long will my tent last? 

Answer

The lifespan of your tent depends on a variety of factors related to use and the environment. UV radiation is the number one enemy of any fabric used outdoors and ultralight fabrics are especially vulnerable. In an expedition setting, where a tent is set up for weeks or months, the fabrics will break down quicker than tents that are set up for 1 or 2 days a month. So it's a one-to-one relationship: more UV leads to quicker breakdown of the fabrics and coatings. Slowing the effects of UV can be achieved by finding shaded camping spots and taking the tent down during the day rather than leaving it exposed to the sun.

Another serious enemy of tents is dirt and sand and the associated abrasion of fabrics, coatings and zipper sliders. After use in gritty environments it is helpful to set the tent up and spray the components with fresh water to wash away grit.

Humidity can also shorten a tent's usable lifespan. If a tent is stored with moisture trapped between layers, mildew will quickly grow and degrade fabrics and coatings.  Mildew will can also leave an offensive odor that can make a tent unusable.

So it is difficult to predict tent lifespan. When used for extended periods at high altitudes tents may last for just one expedition. Conversely, when used less often and treated with care a tent can last for years. 

Sleepingbags

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Question

How do I wash my sleeping bag?

Answer

Washing your sleeping bag too often can damage the insulation (down or synthetic). For most cleaning, we recommend spot cleaning the bag with a damp sponge. If the bag does need a deeper cleaning, use a front load machine only (no agitator!) and use a down wash liquid cleaner from Nikwax or McNett.

To start, zip the bag fully closed. Use the cold water and delicate cycle on a front load machine and do a second rinse cycle once the wash is complete. This will ensure all detergent is removed. Once that is complete, two spin cycles will help remove excess moisture.

It is best to hang and air dry the bag whenever possible.  It may take several days to completely dry, depending on humidity. If you need to dry it faster, use a tumble dryer on low heat. Check in on this often and re-loft the bag as it dries. Feel for any clumps of down and shake the bag before drying again or massage the clumps to break them up. You can also put in a couple of clean new tennis balls to help loosen the down clumps.

Question

How should I store my sleeping bag when not in use? 

Answer

When not in use, we recommend storing your sleeping bag in the large mesh storage sack that was included with the bag when purchased. This ensures the bag's insulation retains the maximum loft and warmth in use. When traveling it is okay to compress the bag and keep it stored in the provided waterproof dry bag.

When you first return from a trip it is very important to let your sleeping bag dry out completely. Unzip the bag, spread it over a couch or several chairs and make sure it’s dry before storing it in the mesh storage bag. You then want to be sure it’s stored in a dry and temperature controlled room away from a spot where any pets may have access.

Question

What are EN ratings for sleeping bags?

Answer

The EN (European Norm) rating is a strict test designed to provide measurable objectives and standardize how sleeping bags are marketed. It is meant to help the consumer make an informed choice using independently derived temperature ratings.

 

Each EN sleeping bag test produces four temperature ratings-Upper Limit, Comfort, Lower Limit and an Extreme rating, with the following definitions:

From Wikipedia:

  • Upper Limit - the temperature at which a standard man* can sleep without excessive perspiration. It is established with the hood and zippers open and with the arms outside of the bag.
  • Comfort - the temperature at which a standard woman* can expect to sleep comfortably in a relaxed position.
  • Lower Limit - the temperature at which a standard man can sleep for eight hours in a curled position without waking.
  • Extreme - the minimum temperature at which a standard woman can remain for six hours without risk of death from hypothermia (though frostbite is still possible).

*For the purpose of these measurements, a "standard man" is assumed to be 25 years old, with a height of 1.73 m and a weight of 73 kg; a "standard woman" is assumed to be 25 years old, with a height of 1.60 m and a weight of 60 kg.

The three ratings commonly advertised are Comfort, (Lower) Limit and Extreme. For Men's bags, most companies advertise the Limit rating, and for women's bags, the Comfort rating, though even this can vary.

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